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Finding a Job: Helpful Hints for the Already Employed

7 Tips To Help You Find Your New Dream Job

We all have those moments where we question whether our current job is the right fit. Maybe the hours are too long, the work unrewarding or the pay too low. Fortunately, if you’re currently employed you’re one step closer to getting a new job.

Here are some helpful hints to make the job search for the already employed just a bit easier!

Investigate.


Is it the pay? Investigate the possibility of a raise. The work? Talk to your supervisor about new opportunities. A fresh project might be exactly what you need to spark yourself out of complacency. The monotony of the office job? Talk to your boss about the possibility of a flex schedule.

Remember, before making any rash decisions, see if you can improve the job you already have, the results may surprise you and it’s lot easier to keep the job you already have, than to find a new one.

Plan.

If you do proceed with your job search, do your homework. What sort of position are you looking for? Is it just the current position you dislike or the whole field? Do you want to stay in the same city, or are you hoping to move? Narrow your search, if you don’t, you’re likely to become overwhelmed. Once you have narrowed your search, create a running list of all the organizations that interest you. Research those organizations; plan informational interviews to find out how they hire their employees. There’s no point in moving from one dissatisfying job to another, so make sure you know what you’re looking for, before jumping into another position.

Volunteer.

This is the perfect opportunity to volunteer at an organization that interests you. It allows you to tap into potential interests, while still being paid at your current position. It will also help fill any resume gaps, while providing an excellent networking opportunity. Employers are definitely more likely to hire you, if they know you and that you have such an interest in their organization that you have been willing to work there for free.

Make the Time.

Between your current job, and other life responsibilities (I mean did I not just tell you start volunteering), it may be difficult to find the time for your job search. But, this is why discipline is critical. Carve out a specific amount of time each weekday and stick to it. Dedicate 45 minutes a day to your job search, whether it’s as soon as you wake up, or just before you go to bed. Take this time to investigate opportunities, revise your resume, and contact current connections. Remember, it is important to do this on your on time, and not on your employer’s dime.

Network.

Large urban centers have networking events every day. Commit to attending one once a week, and staying just long enough to make one new connection. This small time commitment will grow your network exponentially. Also, by creating a specific goal of making just one connection at each event, it will make those nerve-wracking networking events a lot more manageable.

Stay Committed.

Just because you’re looking for a new job, does not give you an excuse to slack off at your current job. In fact, it should give you even more motivation to shine. Your organization likely interacts with several other organizations on a daily basis, whether it is customers, clients or competitors. Take that opportunity to make connections, without overtly letting people know you are in the market for a new position. Loyalty is an important quality, and a shining work product and a desire for new opportunities stand to make you more in demand, than a plea for a new job.

Stay Classy.

If you do get a new job, make sure to treat your past employer with respect. Give the requisite two weeks or more, and be gracious. Networks are very small and reputation is important. You never know when you could run into your past employer in your new position.

Good Luck on Your Job Search!

Written by  Alexandra Gilliland, an environmental urbanite with a love for warm beverages and long city walks.

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